migrantography

migrationnotebook:

Banksy’s take on a real road sign familiar to motorists on Interstate 5 in California. Reporter Leslie Berestein Rojas has more on the sign’s history and even an interview with the image’s DoT designer.

Several of the signs went up in the San Diego area in the early 1990s as a warning to motorists at a time when smugglers were forcing their charges to run across the freeway to evade immigration authorities, often with tragic results.
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migrationnotebook:

Banksy’s take on a real road sign familiar to motorists on Interstate 5 in California. Reporter Leslie Berestein Rojas has more on the sign’s history and even an interview with the image’s DoT designer.

Several of the signs went up in the San Diego area in the early 1990s as a warning to motorists at a time when smugglers were forcing their charges to run across the freeway to evade immigration authorities, often with tragic results.

yagazieemezi:

Meet Your Photographer: Jean Luc Dushime

"Through my work, I want to celebrate the resiliency of the human soul and highlight the unbreakable strength of our spirits to bounce back after tragedies.My goal is to educate,challenge assumptions,foster understanding and bring communities together.

The Hope Within the Hands of Hope Project is a celebration of the resiliency, courage and determination of immigrants that move to a new place, often more than once, in hope to start a new life. Their hands are my subjects because they symbolize the hardship they have witnessed and the hope they carry with them.

I, myself, I am an immigrant.” 

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic


5centsapound:

 Jonas Bendiksen: Far From Home; Guest Workers of the Gulf

This photo essay explores the world of guest workers in the arab Gulf oil states such as United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Kuwait. While marketing itself as luxury playgrounds of tourism and business, close to 90% of UAE and Qatar’s population are foreign workers. Most of these workers come from far poorer nations such as India, Bangladesh, Philippines and Nepal, and the workers often endure very difficult employment and living conditions. Many of the workers take up big loans in their home countries in order to get to the middle east but then struggle to pay the debt in order to gain any profits. Oftentimes parents will leave their homes and children for a decade or more to try to build up savings for their family back home, putting a big strain on family relations. 

The World Bank estimates that the yearly sum of global remittances (the money being sent home by foreign guest workers) amounts to more than double all official foreign aid globally. 

Foreign guest workers therefore have a formidable economic impact, but often at a high personal cost.