thinkmexican:

Mexicans Continue Corn Planting Tradition

Throughout the Eastside of Salinas, and many other Mexican communities in the United States, the tradition of planting corn continues. Whether it’s a small milpa in the backyard or a couple of plants in the front or side of the house (or even apartment building), many Mexican households find the way to at least plant a couple of stalks of corn this time of year. Seems fitting considering corn was created in Mexico’s Tehuacán Valley, and that Mexicans are known as the “People of Corn.”

If you planted corn at home this year and would like to share photos, feel free to send them to us!

Mexican corn backyard farming

fuckyeahapihistory:

Miss Lucy Tom, chief operator, looks on as telephone operators man their boards in the Chinatown Telephone Exchange which handles all of Chinatown’s incoming and outgoing calls. June 19, 1946.
For more than 50 years, the only Chinese telephone exchange outside of China itself was in San Francisco’s Chinatown. It was manned by Chinese men and women who knew by heart the names, addresses and phone numbers of every one of the 2500 Chinatown subscribers. The operators, whose switchboards were flanked by two golden dragons, were fluent in English and several Chinese dialects and were even supposed to know their customers’ favorite hangouts in case they weren’t home when an urgent call came in. 

fuckyeahapihistory:

Miss Lucy Tom, chief operator, looks on as telephone operators man their boards in the Chinatown Telephone Exchange which handles all of Chinatown’s incoming and outgoing calls. June 19, 1946.

For more than 50 years, the only Chinese telephone exchange outside of China itself was in San Francisco’s Chinatown. It was manned by Chinese men and women who knew by heart the names, addresses and phone numbers of every one of the 2500 Chinatown subscribers. The operators, whose switchboards were flanked by two golden dragons, were fluent in English and several Chinese dialects and were even supposed to know their customers’ favorite hangouts in case they weren’t home when an urgent call came in. 

(Source: sflib1.sfpl.org, via orientallyyours)

San Francisco Chinatown telephone 1940s

orientallyyours:

Image 1: Chinese telephone operators in 1930s Shanghai, from the Leo Arnoldov’s book, “China, As It Is” (1933).

Image 2: A still from Orson Welles’ 1947 film, “The Lady from Shanghai” where we see when Rita Hayworth’s character, Elsa, makes a phone call and the call goes through inside San Francisco’s Chinatown telephone exchange.

Image 3: Harriot Ng at work in the same exchange back in 1929.

Image 4:  San Francisco’s Chinese Telephone Exchange in 1913.

Sources: reelsf.com, Virtual Museum of the City of San Francisco,

Shanghai San Francisco Chinatown telephone 1920s 1910s 1930s